Civics: An Essential Subject Pushed Aside

We do our students a disservice when we don’t teach them about their government.  Though many consider civics a higher-level subject, it can easily be adapted for younger grade levels to help them begin understanding and engaging with key concepts.

Career Readiness: Educating Students on Their Options

There seems to be plenty of resources and information available to students planning to attend college, but where do students who have alternate plans turn? There aren’t academic advisors for those not following the traditional route in most public schools. How do we set those students up for success? In today’s post, we will discuss ways you can help support students to discover the path that is right for them. 

The Communication Key

From letter sounds in kindergarten to AP test scores in high school, it’s important for everyone to be informed when it comes to academic success. When parents don’t know what their student is struggling with, they may be unable to help until it’s too late.

Social Delays Due to COVID Policies

But how do children learn to appropriately and confidently engage in social interactions when they miss out on chances to play with peers or aren’t allowed to go out into the community? How do adults maintain those skills when not offered opportunities for socialization?

The Rise of Alternative Education: Charter Schools

The main difference between charter and traditional public schools is autonomy. Charters are free to pursue alternative curriculum approaches and can focus on specific fields of study, such as art and technology. 

The College Conundrum: What Else is There?

It is usually expected that young adults automatically attend college the fall after completing high school. But this brings up an important question: Is college the only option for young adults after high school?

The State of Professional Development

Teacher professional development trainings should be a time to share ways to help kids succeed academically, socially, and emotionally. But are they?

Trends in Pre and Post Pandemic Reading Levels

I would argue that most teachers have a results-first approach to teaching reading. This is not completely their fault, as our educational institutions perpetuate it by forcing them to think in terms of quotas rather than actual learning.